Gwen Antell

Gwen Antell

Postgraduate

I am a palaebiologist who explores macroecology and evolution at a range of spatial, temporal, and taxonomic scales. I began my doctoral research at Oxford under supervision of Erin Saupe in October 2017. We build statistical models to evaluate the interactions among species and environmental variables. One goal of the research is to apply knowledge from past extinctions to conservation biology so that we might better protect the living species most at risk under current scenarios of environmental change.

For more about me and my work, check out my website or recent interview with PhDetails.

Antell, G.S., Kiessling, W., Aberhan, M., & Saupe (2020). “Marine biodiversity and geographic distributions are independent on large scales.” Current Biology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2019.10.065

Press release: https://www.mpls.ox.ac.uk/news/species-that-survive-mass-extinction-events-do-not-take-over-the-space-of-fallen-competitors

[4] Darroch, S.A.F., Casey, M., Antell, G.S., Sweeney, A., & Saupe, E.E. (in review) “High preservation potential of range size-extinction risk signals in deep time.” American Naturalist.

[3] Antell, G.S., Kiessling, W., Aberhan, M., & Saupe (2020) “Marine biodiversity and geographic distributions are independent on large scales.” Current Biology. https://doi.org/10.1016/j.cub.2019.10.065 Press release: https://www.mpls.ox.ac.uk/news/species-that-survive-mass-extinction-events-do-not-take-over-the-space-of-fallen-competitors

[2] Antell, G.S. (2018) “Digitization reveals and remediates challenges to research on dispersed museum collections from Florissant fossil beds, Colorado.” In: Rosenberg G and Clary R (eds) Museums at the forefront of the history and philosophy of geology: History made, history in the making. Boulder, Colorado. Geological Society of America special papers volume 535.

[1] Antell, G.S., & Kathirithamby, J. (2016) “The first twisted-wing parasitoids (Insecta: Strepsiptera) from the Early Eocene Green River Formation of Colorado.” Bulletin of the Peabody Museum of Natural History. 57(2): 165-174. https://doi.org/10.3374/014.057.0204

Please email me if you have difficulty accessing a PDF of any article.