The First Billion Years of Lunar Evolution: A Geophysical Perspective

The First Billion Years of Lunar Evolution: A Geophysical Perspective

Details
Venue

Online, via Zoom link

View on Google Maps
Date
Fri 15th Oct 2021
Cost
Free
Time
2 pm
Booking required
No


Abstract: 
Although several aspects surrounding the early evolution of our Solar System remain shrouded in mystery, the Moon has recorded on its well-preserved and ancient surface much of the history of our Solar System.  With accessibility and data returned from orbital and landed spacecraft, the Moon has a unique role in understanding and constraining the evolution of the planets in our Solar System, as well as the timing of its many major events. In this talk, I attempt to unravel some of the mysteries of the Moon from its surface down to its core, to reveal a new understanding of the Moon, the Earth, and the Solar System.

Joining instruction: join via Zoom link >>

Upcoming events
22
Oct

Segmentation of subducting oceanic plates by brittle-ductile damage

  • Departmental Seminars
29
Oct

Silicic magmatism: granite pluton growth, magma chamber formation and volcanism

  • Departmental Seminars
5
Nov

The dynamics of volcanic conduits: views from the inside and the outside

  • Departmental Seminars